pushing20

maybe all one can do is hope to end up with the right regrets. -arthur miller

5.29.2005

As if I needed more reasons why I didn't want to live in LA...

I saw Crash with my mother the other night, and it made me realize something: LA, despite being home of the entertainment industry, is portrayed as the worst place ever on the silver screen.



Overall, I thught Crash was a really good movie. It examined race tensions and class structures in Los Angeles. A bit heavyhanded at times, but unexpectedly powerful performances by Matt Dillon, Don Cheadle, and (to my complete shock) Ludacris made it worth the $10.75. (Side note: theater owners are criminal for charging that much. End rant. Exhale.) Despite (or becasue of) the powerful performances, I left the theater believing that LA was this racially segregated hellhole, plagued by so many social ills I'm shocked it doesn't curl up and die. Plus, it made the LAPD look like racist assholes. Becuase I guess we haven't had a new reason to hate the LAPD in a while.

It got me thinking about other instances of LA in the movies. First thing that came to mind was Collateral.

There's a great example of fine, upstanding Angelenos.

Magnolia
? Boogie Nights? Almost enough to make you lose faith in the possiblity of human happiness.

Interested in dismal views of the future? Check out the Los Angeles-set Terminator and Blade Runner .

Training Day gives us yet another glowing appraisal of the LAPD, just in case the memory of Rodney King has faded.

For god's sake, even Pretty Woman, a generally fun movie that I watch pretty much every time it's on cable (which is basically twice a week) is about a prostitute, for fuck's sake.

2 Comments:

  • At 5/30/2005 11:30 AM, Blogger kimberley said…

    I just watched Pretty Woman on TBS last night. The perfect hangover cure is that movie, gatorade, and a lot of fucking pasta.

    Cheers!

     
  • At 5/30/2005 11:35 AM, Anonymous CT said…

    Um.... There's movies, and then there's real life. Believe it or not, what's depicted on the big screen isn't necessarily how it really is -- in fact, it's usually not a balanced portrayal. If you're relying on these fictionalized accounts (as good as they are, although I was let down by Crash) to inform you about what other places are like, you're handicapping yourself.

     

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